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dc.contributor.author Schraft, Hannes A.
dc.contributor.author Medina, Orlando J.
dc.contributor.author McClure, Jesse
dc.contributor.author Pereira, Daniel A.
dc.contributor.author Logue, David M.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-20T22:48:07Z
dc.date.available 2020-08-20T22:48:07Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Schraft, H. A., Medina, O. J., McClure, J., Pereira, D. A., & Logue, D. M. (2017). Within-day improvement in a behavioural display: Wild birds 'warm up'. Animal Behaviour, 124, 167-174. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.12.026 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/5748
dc.description Permission to archive accepted author manuscript. en_US
dc.description.abstract Motor performance describes the vigour or skill required to perform a particular display. It is a behaviourally salient variable in birdsong and other animal displays, but little is known about within-individual variation in performance over short timescales. The metric ‘frequency excursion’ (FEX) quantifies birdsong performance as cumulative frequency modulation per unit time. We measured FEX in a large sample of recordings from free-living male Adelaide's warblers, Setophaga adelaidae. Our objectives were to quantify natural variation in performance and test the hypotheses that performance (1) improves as a function of recent practise, (2) decreases over consecutive repetitions of a single song type, (3) improves with rest between songs, (4) varies by singing mode and (5) changes during vocal interactions with neighbours. We found significant variation in performance among individuals and song types. Consecutive repetition of a song type, rest between songs, singing mode and vocal interaction did not strongly affect performance. Performance consistently increased with song order, however, indicating that males warm up during morning singing. This is the first demonstration of such an effect in a sexual display. The warm-up effect may explain the prevalence of intense dawn singing in birds (dawn chorus), if rivals engage in an arms race to warm up. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.subject Anti-exhaustion hypothesis en_US
dc.subject Behavioural display en_US
dc.subject Dawn chorus en_US
dc.subject Frequency excursion en_US
dc.subject Performance en_US
dc.subject Warm-up hypothesis
dc.subject Adelaide's warblers
dc.subject.lcsh Songbirds--Behavior
dc.subject.lcsh Birdsongs
dc.subject.lcsh Setophaga
dc.title Within-day improvement in a behavioural display: wild birds 'warm up' en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.publisher.faculty Arts and Science en_US
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_US
dc.description.peer-review Yes en_US
dc.publisher.institution San Diego State University en_US
dc.publisher.institution University of California, Davis en_US
dc.publisher.institution University of Puerto Rico en_US
dc.publisher.institution University of Massachusetts en_US
dc.publisher.institution Universidad del Valle en_US
dc.publisher.institution University of Lethbridge en_US
dc.publisher.url https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.12.026 en_US


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