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dc.contributor.supervisor Lafreniere, Katherine Carol
dc.contributor.author Grewal, Gurinder Singh
dc.contributor.author University of Lethbridge. Dhillon School of Business
dc.date.accessioned 2022-09-15T15:41:42Z
dc.date.available 2022-09-15T15:41:42Z
dc.date.issued 2022
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10133/6332
dc.description.abstract When might brands benefit from using swearwords in their communications material? This research theorizes and finds that the effect of a swearword in an advertisement on consumers’ attitudes towards the brand is moderated by the consumers’ self-construal. When the swearword was present (verses absent), those with an independent self-construal reported stronger interpersonal closeness and resultingly more favorable attitudes towards the brand. In contrast, those with an interdependent self-construal reported weaker interpersonal closeness and less favorable attitudes towards the brand. The study also assessed humour, credibility, and arousal as alternative explanations. The study contributes theoretically to the areas of marketing and psychology. It introduces a new mediator for the swearing effect and extends prior work on the relationship between self-construal and interpersonal closeness. This study also informs marketers by making recommendations for the use of swearwords in their communication material. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Dhillon School of Business en_US
dc.language.iso en_CA en_US
dc.publisher Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge. Dhillon School of Business
dc.relation.ispartofseries Thesis (University of Lethbridge. Dhillon School of Business)
dc.subject linguistics en_US
dc.subject marketing en_US
dc.subject public relations en_US
dc.subject PR en_US
dc.subject brand communications en_US
dc.subject swearwords en_US
dc.subject self-construal en_US
dc.subject interpersonal closeness en_US
dc.subject IOS en_US
dc.subject interdependent en_US
dc.subject independent en_US
dc.subject construal en_US
dc.subject B2C en_US
dc.subject consumer behaviour en_US
dc.subject consumer psychology en_US
dc.subject transgressions en_US
dc.subject crisis response en_US
dc.subject brand crisis en_US
dc.subject profanity en_US
dc.subject communications en_US
dc.subject advertising en_US
dc.subject brand attitudes en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Marketing
dc.subject.lcsh Communication in marketing
dc.subject.lcsh Public relations
dc.subject.lcsh Consumer behavior
dc.subject.lcsh Swearing--Public opinion
dc.subject.lcsh Advertising--Language--Psychological aspects
dc.subject.lcsh Obscene words--Psychological aspects
dc.subject.lcsh Branding (Marketing)--Language
dc.subject.lcsh Popular culture
dc.subject.lcsh English language--Obscene words
dc.subject.lcsh Taboo, Linguistic
dc.subject.lcsh Consumers--Attitudes
dc.subject.lcsh Social norms
dc.subject.lcsh Self-perception
dc.subject.lcsh Dissertations, Academic
dc.title FCK, we're sorry: self-construal, interpersonal closeness, and swearwords in brand communications en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.publisher.faculty Dhillon School of Business en_US
dc.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.proquest.subject 0338 en_US
dc.proquest.subject 0290 en_US
dc.proquest.subject 0708 en_US
dc.proquestyes Yes en_US


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